Dana
APES period 2
external image un_fritt.jpg

Uncompahgre Fritillary Butterfly (Boloria acrocnema)

Kingdom: Animalia
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Nymphalidae








Description:

A small butterfly with a 2-3 cm (1 inch) wingspan. Males have rusty brown wings criss-crossed with black bars; females’ wings are somewhat lighter. The body has a rusty brown thorax and a brownish black abdomen. Eating habits of the caterpillars include eating the willows' leaves. Their eggs are laid singly on stems of host plant dwarf willows.The Uncompahgre fritillary butterfly was discovered on Uncompahgre Peak, Hinsdale County, Colorado on July 30, 1978. It was then listed as endangered in Colorado in 1991 .






Habitat:

The Uncompahgre fritillary butterfly lives in patches of snow willow at high elevations. They are usually found in Colorado is various counties. They stay around the area and don't migrate to any new place. They have a very limited habitat. They often have a small population size, and low genetic variability, which may affect long-term population stability. The species is susceptible to trampling by recreationists and grazing animals.






Problems:

The habitat of the butterfly is being decresed at a rapid rate, leaving them little space to increase their popuation size. Grazing animals pose a problem because they take up habitat that could be used by the butterflies. Recreationists also take up land that could be used to spark up an increase in butterflies.






Solutions:

Steps in conservation have been increasing in the recent years as more people are noticing that the butterflies are becoming less and less a part of the ecosystem. Measures have been taken to help protect the butterflies, such as: Illegal collecting of the buterflies, destructin of habitat, and the constant fight against global warming. Education is a key part of helping to get the population of the butterfly back on track. More knowledge of the issues facing this species are being brought forward, in order to educate people and help improve the chance of them not becoming extinct.






References:


http://ecos.fws.gov/speciesProfile/profile/speciesProfile.action?spcode=I01Q
"The Butterfly Conservation Initiative " http://www.butterflyrecovery.org/species_profiles/uncompahgre_fritillary/